Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause. Part 3 of 3

Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause – Part 3 of 3

Dr Elizabeth Poynor, an obstetrician-gynecologist affiliated with Lenox Hill Hospital, said the cramming findings are “good news. I think this study provides a ground work to look at it (hot flashes) in larger, more detailed and comprehensive studies. It’s very promising”.

Poynor said the workroom provides an impetus to women who need to lose weight for other health reasons, such as diabetes or heart disease, because it can reduce problems like sleep brawl that can lead to problems with concentration and poor functioning in general. “It can really help to have a very significant altered quality of life,” said Poynor, noting that the physiology of hot flashes, “at least in department a vascular event,” is poorly understood and needs more study malebox.us. “However, this study provides women and their health care professionals who care for them another intervention to help with bothersome hot flashes in women who are overweight”.

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Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause. Part 2 of 3

Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause – Part 2 of 3

They were also asked about their daily exercise, caloric intake, and nuts and physical functioning using instruments widely accepted in the medical field, said Huang. No correlation was found between any of these and a reduction in hot flashes, but “reduction in weight, body mass hint (BMI), and abdominal circumference were each associated with improvements” in reducing hot flashes, according to the study, published in the July 12 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

overweight

Huang said that caloric intake and operation were measured by the participants, who were not always accurate, but “weight can be measured by stepping on scale,” so weight loss is a “more accurate measure” of what happened. About 340 study participants, at least 30 years old, were recruited from a larger consider of overweight and obese middle-aged women suffering from incontinence. They were not told the study was examining the effect of weight loss on hot flashes.

At the study’s start, about half of both the swat and control groups reported having hot flashes; about half of these were at least moderately bothered, and 8,4 percent were extremely bothered. By six months, 49 percent in the chew over group, compared with 41 percent in the control group, reported improvement by “at least one category of bothersomeness”.

That might not seem like a big difference. But Huang added that, “although 41 percent of women in the curb group experienced improvement in hot flashes, quite of few of them experienced improvement by only one category of ‘bothersomeness’ (as opposed to two categories). Also, of those women in the in check group who did not experience improvement, relatively more of them experienced actual worsening of hot flashes (as opposed to no change)”.

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Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause. Part 1 of 3

Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause – Part 1 of 3

Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause. Weight impairment might help middle-aged women who are overweight or pot-bellied reduce bothersome hot flashes accompanying menopause, according to a new study. “We’ve known for some time that obesity affects hot flashes, but we didn’t certain if losing weight would have any effect,” said Dr Alison Huang, the study’s author. “Now there is good evidence losing weight can reduce hot flashes”.

Study participants were part of an focused lifestyle-intervention program designed to help them lose between 7 percent and 9 percent of their weight. Huang, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of California, San Francisco, said the findings could produce women with another reason to take control of their weight. “The message here is that there is something you can do about it (hot flashes)”.

About one third of women experience hot flashes for five years or more on menopause, “disrupting sleep, interfering with work and leisure activities, and exacerbating anxiety and depression,” according to the study. The women in the study group met with experts in nutrition, exercise and behavior weekly for an hour and were encouraged to trouble at least 200 minutes a week and reduce caloric intake to 1200-1500 calories per day. They also got help planning menus and choosing what kinds of foods to eat.

Women in a hold sway over group received monthly group education classes for the first four months. Participants, including those in the control group, were asked to respond to a survey at the beginning of the exploration and six months later to describe how bothersome hot flashes were for them in the past month on a five-point scale with answers ranging from “not at all” to “extremely”.

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Infection With Ascaris Eggs Relieves Symptoms Of Ulcerative Colitis. Part 3 of 3

Infection With Ascaris Eggs Relieves Symptoms Of Ulcerative Colitis – Part 3 of 3

Colitis is low-grade in developed countries such as America – where parasitic worm infections are rare – and in Asia, Africa and Latin America, where virtually the entire population is infected, the study noted. Clinical trials with the pig whipworm Trichuris suis have improved the symptoms of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, and unrefined studies suggest that various parasitic worms can suppress inflammation, the study noted.

The library also suggests new, worm-based treatments for both ulcerative colitis and IBD. Research might identify molecules derived from worms that suppress inflammation, or pathways activated by worms that can be targeted by more agreed approaches.

Right now, however, worm therapy is still not well-understood and could potentially backfire, the study warned. “The problem is that these worms themselves can cause harm and damage the gut. The individual in this study is propitious to have responded so well, but for other people the worm infection may exacerbate bowel inflammation” click here. Studies that use the pig worm, which should pose less risk to humans, are under way.

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Infection With Ascaris Eggs Relieves Symptoms Of Ulcerative Colitis. Part 2 of 3

Infection With Ascaris Eggs Relieves Symptoms Of Ulcerative Colitis – Part 2 of 3

Tissue captivated during active colitis showed a large number of CD4+ T-cells, which are immune cells that produce the inflammatory protein interleukin-17, the tandem found. However, tissue taken after worm therapy, when his colitis was in remission, contained lots of T-cells that make interleukin-22 (IL-22), a protein that promotes wound healing.

ulcerative

Further, after worm therapy, the man’s colon produced significantly more mucus who prominent that a lack of mucus in the colon is linked with severe symptoms. “We think the worms increase or restore mucus fabrication in the colon. Basically, the gut is trying to expel the worms.

This increase in mucus may play a role in relieving the symptoms. This is not the usual clinical trial, but you take your opportunities for unique observation where you can,” said Dr Gerald W Dryden Jr, governor of the clinical research division of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition at the University of Louisville, in Kentucky.

Before this study, IL-22 had not been associated with salubrious effect in IBD, said Dryden. “While it doesn’t determine cause-and-effect, the study does seem to demonstrate an important, previously unknown association between IL-22 and response to helminthic therapy”.

Causing abdominal pain, diarrhea and other symptoms, colitis affects about 700000 Americans, according to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America. Scientists don’t separate what causes the disease, but theorize that immune-system dysfunction plays a role.

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Infection With Ascaris Eggs Relieves Symptoms Of Ulcerative Colitis. Part 1 of 3

Infection With Ascaris Eggs Relieves Symptoms Of Ulcerative Colitis – Part 1 of 3

Infection With Ascaris Eggs Relieves Symptoms Of Ulcerative Colitis. The victim of a man who swallowed parasite eggs to treat his ulcerative colitis – and in fact got better – sheds light on how “worm therapy” might help heal the gut, a new study suggests. “Our findings in this case report suggest that infection with the eggs of the T trichiura roundworm can alleviate the symptoms of ulcerative colitis,” said mug up leader P’ng Loke, an assistant professor in the department of medical parasitology at NYU Langone Medical Center. A understanding parasite, Trichuris trichiura infects the large intestine.

The findings could also lead to new ways to treat the debilitating disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) currently treated with drugs that don’t always job and can cause serious side effects, said Loke. The study findings are published in the Dec 1, 2010 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Loke and his pair followed a 35-year-old man with severe colitis who tried worm (or “helminthic”) therapy to avoid surgical removal of his entire colon. He researched the therapy, flew to a tamper with in Thailand who had agreed to give him the eggs, and swallowed 1500 of them.

The man contacted Loke after his self-treatment and “was essentially symptom-free”. Intrigued, he and his colleagues decided to follow the man’s condition.

The study analyzed slides and samples of the man’s blood and colon concatenation from 2003, before he swallowed the eggs, to 2009, a few years after ingestion. During this period, he was virtually symptom-free for almost three years. When his colitis flared in 2008, he swallowed another 2000 eggs and got better again, said Loke.

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Using Non-Recommended Drugs For The Treatment Of Diabetes. Part 3 of 3

Using Non-Recommended Drugs For The Treatment Of Diabetes – Part 3 of 3

Commenting on the new study, Dr Luigi Meneghini, professor and director of clinical operations in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, said “there was still some mix-up about the negative effects of Avandia. Physicians tend to be skeptical and not change their habits unless there is solid evidence, and with Avandia the evidence was not as solid as one would want. But, for the preponderance of physicians there was clearly a change in the way they prescribe”.

With the new restrictions the FDA has placed on Avandia, Meneghini believes that very few doctors will be prescribing the drug anymore. Meneghini added that the FDA is unbelievably good at getting warning information out to doctors. “Whether the warning is heeded depends on the availability of the drug, the importance of the drug and patient desires”. Also, many doctors stopped prescribing Avandia when the lesson came out due to fear of liability scriptovore.com. “That drove a lot of the decisions”.

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